onehandedabortionisttwerker:


photoshopped the fedora in because it’s pretty much implied

onehandedabortionisttwerker:

image

photoshopped the fedora in because it’s pretty much implied

10,339 notes

death-by-lulz:

This post has been featured on a 1000notes.com blog.

death-by-lulz:

This post has been featured on a 1000notes.com blog.

(Source: tibets)

9,575 notes

death-by-lulz:

kinglers:
Brock, teaching boys and girls how to be thirsty since gen 1

This post has been featured on a 1000notes.com blog.

death-by-lulz:

kinglers:

Brock, teaching boys and girls how to be thirsty since gen 1

This post has been featured on a 1000notes.com blog.

(Source: heliolisk)

4,796 notes

bythegods:

bythegods:

This is relevant to your interests.

I need to put this up here again, guys.I’m really starting to think it’s the best thing I’ve ever seen in my life. I’m not in any way exaggerating.

bythegods:

bythegods:

This is relevant to your interests.

I need to put this up here again, guys.

I’m really starting to think it’s the best thing I’ve ever seen in my life.

I’m not in any way exaggerating.

(Source: tomippen)

1,469 notes

bythegods:

forlackofabettercomic:

Consider yourselves judged.

This is relevant to your interests.The apocalypse is something that most scripture devotes at least a little time to. If you’re gonna write a beginning and a middle, might as well scribble together an ending, right?
The book of Revelations is a particularly heated peace of apocalyptic scripture for a few reasons.
First off, many of the predictions are so vague/historically abundant that it’s provided religious “evidence” of the end times’ approach to every generation between John the Apostle (the purported scribe of the book who few now believe to have been the true author) and today. Wars, disease, and celestial twinkles aren’t exactly something the human race has ever had to do without for more than a year or two. 
Also, it’s worth noting that the Book of Revelations—all of it—was written specifically as a piece of anti-Roman propaganda. The oft-referenced beast with seven heads, for example, is a thinly veiled reference for the famed seven hills on which Rome was built. Also, any time the New Testament refers to Babylon, they’re talking about Rome. Mean ol’ Rome. 
So, specifically, the powers of the Christian heavens are meant to come down, bringing swift justice upon the oppressive (to Christians) Empire. As some of you may know, that didn’t quite happen. And now we’re left with a book that the church could’ve quietly retired from the canon, but instead just repurposed for whichever political opponent of the day was up in their grill.
A whole lot of people are eagerly awaiting good ol’ Jesus riding in on his white horse (literally) while simultaneously appearing as a (literal) lamb, fighting a dragon, a seven-headed beast, and a magic lady riding said beast, and then fighting a long, painful war on the scorched remains of the earth. Suggestions of “are you perhaps familiar with the art of metaphor?” seem to fall on deaf ears.

bythegods:

forlackofabettercomic:

Consider yourselves judged.

This is relevant to your interests.

The apocalypse is something that most scripture devotes at least a little time to. If you’re gonna write a beginning and a middle, might as well scribble together an ending, right?

The book of Revelations is a particularly heated peace of apocalyptic scripture for a few reasons.

First off, many of the predictions are so vague/historically abundant that it’s provided religious “evidence” of the end times’ approach to every generation between John the Apostle (the purported scribe of the book who few now believe to have been the true author) and today. Wars, disease, and celestial twinkles aren’t exactly something the human race has ever had to do without for more than a year or two. 

Also, it’s worth noting that the Book of Revelations—all of it—was written specifically as a piece of anti-Roman propaganda. The oft-referenced beast with seven heads, for example, is a thinly veiled reference for the famed seven hills on which Rome was built. Also, any time the New Testament refers to Babylon, they’re talking about Rome. Mean ol’ Rome. 

So, specifically, the powers of the Christian heavens are meant to come down, bringing swift justice upon the oppressive (to Christians) Empire. As some of you may know, that didn’t quite happen. And now we’re left with a book that the church could’ve quietly retired from the canon, but instead just repurposed for whichever political opponent of the day was up in their grill.

A whole lot of people are eagerly awaiting good ol’ Jesus riding in on his white horse (literally) while simultaneously appearing as a (literal) lamb, fighting a dragon, a seven-headed beast, and a magic lady riding said beast, and then fighting a long, painful war on the scorched remains of the earth. Suggestions of “are you perhaps familiar with the art of metaphor?” seem to fall on deaf ears.

24,746 notes